Color Location-Based Photo Sharing App Hits the App Store

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A new social networking application called Color hit the App Store today, and unlike any other social network this one uses location-based technology to share photos, comments, and videos with other Color users located within 150 feet. Instead of adding friends or following other users, the network works on location data alone to provide a list of other Color users in close proximity, allowing you to enjoy the photographs they’ve uploaded.

It’s a unique new way of interacting with other people that requires no login ID or password, no friending, and more importantly no way of controlling who can and cannot view the pictures you’ve uploaded. Bill Nguyen, one of Color’s creators, described the application to the Associated Press:

“The days of having to say anything are done. There’re no more profiles, there’s no more friending, there’s no more electronic dog fence created by Facebook. It’s all over. This is the post-PC world. It’s a brand new way of sharing.”

Color has instantly rocketed into the limelight since its launch thanks to the team behind the application, Color Lab, which consists Bill Nguyen, founder of Lala (purchased by Apple); Peter Pham of BillShrink; and DJ Patil, former chief scientist of LinkedIn. The company secured a whopping $41 million in funding from Sequoia Capital, Bain Capital, and Silicon Valley Bank before the application was even launched.

Privacy is of course a concern for Color users – with no way of limiting who can view your photos, they’re free for anyone to take a look at once they’re published. The company’s privacy terms for the application states:

“When you create content using our app, that content is immediately published to any unique user who has the app open near you, and often to unique users with whom you’ve had past contact with (whether they are geographically close or not). That content is also published and available for viewing through various social media sites. Unique users can view your content and can send to anyone a link to your content, the content of other unique users, or compilations that include your content. Anyone: from grandparents to bosses.”

Despite the application’s backing and the brains behind the whole idea, Color still hasn’t gotten off to a great start in its iOS debut. A slow takeoff means that early adopters don’t really have enough users around them to interact with, and this, coupled with software bugs and slow loading times, means the application has received bad ratings and reviews in the App Store. However, we’ll give it a little more time before brandishing it a flop.

[via InformationWeek]

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  • ComputerAddict

    I do not know! Its too early to comment. I just tried this app on my phone and now I am writing here so may be This App is going to good.