Adobe Kills Mobile Flash Development

Adobe confirmed last week that it would be halting work on its Flash Player for mobile devices and refocus its efforts on HTML5 and Air development. Bug fixes and security updates will be released when necessary, but no new features will be added.

However, HTML5 is now universally supported on major mobile devices, in some cases exclusively.  This makes HTML5 the best solution for creating and deploying content in the browser across mobile platforms. We are excited about this, and will continue our work with key players in the HTML community, including Google, Apple, Microsoft and RIM, to drive HTML5 innovation they can use to advance their mobile browsers.

iOS devices will not be affected by this shutdown, since they never ran the Flash Player in the first place. Apple refused to support it. Steve Jobs himself wrote an open letter back in April 2010 laying out the reasons why. Those included that it was proprietary, unstable, and a resource hog, among other things

An Adobe engineer admitted this had much to do with the decision to abandon the mobile Flash Player. They grew to realize the player would never be ubiquitous on mobile platforms like it had been on the desktop. Instead, HTML5 now has many of the features that once could only be done using Flash.

The decision to stop development of the Flash Player plugin for mobile browsers was part of a larger strategic shift at Adobe, one which includes a greater shift in focus toward HTML5,

Flash is still an active environment for desktops, but with much of today’s web traffic being generated by mobile devices many developers may choose to write code in HTML5 and CSS that can be run on all mobile and desktop platforms.

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